Astronomy Events in 2018

Astronomy in November 2018

With dark skies back and the good weather holding, there may even be some cloudless
night skies to enjoy. Here are some suggestions for things to look out for in October.

NOVEMBER

5/6 Nov: Taurids Meteor Shower. The Taurids is a long-running minor meteor
shower producing  about 5-10 meteors per hour. It is unusual in that it consists
of two separate streams. The first is produced by dust grains left behind by
Asteroid 2004 TG10. The second stream is produced by debris left behind by
Comet 2P Encke. The shower runs annually from 7 September to 10 December.
The thin crescent moon will set early in the evening leaving dark skies for viewing.
Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location. Meteors will radiate
from the constellation Taurus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

6 Nov: Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation of 23.3 degrees from the Sun.
This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above
the horizon in the evening sky. Look for the planet low in the western sky just
after sunset.

7 Nov: New Moon. The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the
Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. A good time to observe faint objects
such as galaxies and star clusters.

16 Nov: Conjunction of the Moon and Mars

17 Oct: M45 is well placed

17/18 Nov: Leonid Meteor Shower. Produces up to 15 meteors per hour at its peak.
This shower is unique in that it has a cyclonic peak about every 33 years where
hundreds of meteors per hour can be seen. That last of these occurred in 2001.
The Leonids is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tempel-Tuttle, which
was discovered in 1865. The shower runs annually from 6 to 30 November. Best
viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the
constellation Leo, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

23 Nov: Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as
the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

27 Nov: Close approach of the Moon and M44

30 Nov:  Venus at greatest brightness

 

For more ideas and information on what to observe this month, please visit

Jodrell Bank's Night Sky Guide